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P.O. Box 7400 Baulkham Hills BC NSW 2153

Phone: 02 8847 0631
Fax: 02 9894 9275

info@betterracking.com.au

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Glossary of Terms

Racking, Shelving and General warehouse terms explained

Pallet Racking

Pallet racking is a term to describe systems designed to store palletised goods to avoid block stacking. There are a few different systems that all vary in floor utilisation, stock density and most importantly cost. Pallet Racking is generally the easiest way to utilise the area above whatever is stored on the ground.

Pallet Racking Frame

The Pallet Racking frames are usually made from 2 single posts with bracing that zigzags its way in between and sets the depth of the frame. The pallet racking frames are usually bolted together with feet on the bottom of the frame. Both the front and back posts have incremental holes all the way along them. The holes in the post are how the pallet racking load beams are fixed to the frames. Pallet Racking frames can vary greatly in weight capacity as most brands have different strength frames for different applications. The thickness of the steel often determines the weight capacity, however there also can be variations in the ‘tensile strength’ of the steel used

Also referred as: Uprights, Posts, Vertical pieces.

Pallet Racking Beam

The pallet racking load beams have hooks or prongs on a connector that hook onto the face of the frame. As the pallet racking load beam is lowered correctly into place each connector has a spring loaded, locking pin that slips into one of the holes on the pallet racking frame. These pallet racking load beams can vary in length and weight capacity. Much like the pallet racking frame, load beams can vary in thickness, profile and tensile strength of the steel being used.

Also referred as: Load Beams, Cross Beams, Bars, Horizontal Bars

Load Beam Safety Pin

The locking pins stop the pallet racking load beams from being able to be lifted back out of place by accident. Generally they are a spring loaded locking pin that is attached to the pallet racking load beam prior to installation. When the pallet racking load beam is installed the safety pin locks itself into place.

Block Stacking

Block Stacking is a term used to describe when pallets are stacked one on top of another. Whereas this might work for very square, very solid items it also carries with it inherent dangers. These dangers included load instability (increasing with height), damage to stock due to additional weight, very low stock accessibility and rotation. Stock density is usually very good as no floor space or air space is unused.

Selective Pallet Racking

Selective Pallet Racking is the most common type of pallet racking. Selective Pallet Racking usually consists of vertical pallet racking frames and horizontal pallet racking load beams. This type of pallet racking gets its name of Selective Pallet Racking by the ease at which the load beams can be removed and a new beam level can be selected. Therefore as stock levels and types change the selective pallet racking can be altered to suit the stock requirements. The pallet racking is usually loaded using some type of forked lifting device.

This type of pallet racking is generally used by warehouse owners that store a lot of different types of pallets and may need to access any pallet at any time.

This type of pallet racking generally has the lowest floor utilisation as aisles are needed in between rows of racking. Pallet accessibility is 100%.

Double Deep, Selective Pallet Racking

Double Deep, Selective Pallet Racking is essentially the same as standard Selective Pallet Racking, the difference is that one row of pallet racking is run behind another row of pallet racking. This means that when storing pallets the pallet must be placed on the back row first before the front pallet can be loaded onto the front row of pallet racking. Likewise when the back pallet is needed the front pallet must be removed first to gain access to it. Often guide rails are installed on the higher beam levels to help guide the pallets into the correct position.

This type of pallet racking is generally used by warehouse owners that have 2 – 10 pallets of the same item and don’t need access to every pallet.

This type of pallet racking doubles the stock density, increases floor utilisation, however lowers pallet accessibility to 50%.

Narrow Aisle, Selective Pallet Racking

Narrow Aisle, Selective Pallet Racking is  essentially the same as standard Selective Pallet Racking, the difference is that the rows of pallet racking are run very close together. The aisles are generally very tight and standard forklifts will not be able to operate in these aisle. The aisle may be as small as a couple of metres and usually require a turret forklift, or similar, to access the pallets.

This type of pallet racking is generally used by warehouse owners that store a lot of different types of pallets and may need to access any pallet at any time. However with Narrow Aisle, Selective Pallet Racking the floor space is generally very limited so utilisation needs to be maximized.

This type of pallet racking has moderate floor utilisation as aisles are reduced in between rows of racking. Pallet accessibility is 100%.

Drive In Pallet Racking

Drive-in Pallet Racking is named because the forklift actually ‘Drives Into’ the pallet racking. This system uses a first in last out style of storage. It is generally used to store quantities of the same product that may be held such as seasonal stock. It works similar to product on a supermarket shelf; the first product is put on the shelf at the back, then similar products are place in front of it and the last product put on the shelf is the first one removed by the customer. Not only do the pallets stack front to back, but there can be many levels high as well. This is a very high density storage method as it virtually eliminates wasted aisle space. Drive In Pallet Racking uses some components of the Selective Pallet Racking system.  However, the majority of the components are bolted into place therefore reducing the ability to alter the beam levels.

This type of pallet racking is generally used by warehouse owners that have 10+ pallets of the same item and don’t need access to every pallet.

This type of pallet racking has very high stock density, high floor utilisation, however has very low pallet accessibility which varies from design to design.

Pallet Rack Shelving

Pallet Rack Shelving uses Pallet Racking frames with various light and medium duty pallet racking load beams depending on load requirements of the product. This style of shelving can be beneficial for the business that likes to store their pallets directly above picking shelves for ease of restocking. Pallet Rack Shelving can also support more weight than the other types of shelving. Often the actual shelving material used is a compressed chipped timber product such as Particleboard or MDF. Other shelving materials include Laminate Particleboard and galvanised steel Mesh Decks

Long Span Shelving

Long Span Shelving is like a scaled down version of Pallet Rack Shelving. The beams have a recessed inside edges so the shelf actually sits level with the top of the beam. This eliminates any need for screwing the shelf down. Generally the Long Span Shelving system can handle less weight than the Pallet Racking Shelving system. There are however specialty beams that can support a lot of weight. Shelf options include; MDF and Particleboard timber shelves, Powder coated steel shelves, and Mesh.

Rivet Shelving

Rivet Shelving is a boltless shelving system. Rivet Shelving locks together using rivets on the shelving beams that slot into keyholes in the vertical posts. Much like the Long Span Shelving the shelving beams have a recessed inside edge so that the shelf site level with the top of the beam, eliminating an need for screwing the shelf down. Generally a lighter duty shelving that caters for smaller, tighter areas where space it limited Shelf options include; MDF and Particleboard timber shelves.

Particleboard

Particleboard is a timber product that consists of very small chips of timber from timber mills. These chips are glued and compressed into a sheet. These sheets can then be cut to size to fit any number of our shelving products.

Also referred to as:  Chipboard

Laminate Particleboard

Laminate Particleboard is the same timber product as standard particleboard however it has a laminate finish to it, similar to a kitchen bench. This means that over time the sheet will be more resilient to damage, water and is easier to clean.

MDF

MDF is a timber product is similar to Particleboard, however it uses the sawdust instead of the very small chips. This gives the MDF a denser and smoother finish than Particleboard. The MDF is generally stronger and heavier than Particleboard and also usually cost a little more.

Mesh Decks – Pallet Racking

Mesh Decks are a steel mesh product that has been manufactured to fit on some of our Pallet Racking and Shelving Products.

Pallet Racking Mesh Decks are generally a galvanised steel mesh which sits on top of the pallet racking load beams. Then Mesh has been formed to extend and drop down over the front and back load beams locking the Mesh Deck in place. The Mesh Decks have support bars welded to the bottom of the Mesh Deck to support the load that is placed on it.

A Mesh Deck would normally be used in the following circumstances:

-    When a pallet is an irregular size and doesn’t sit correctly on the Pallet Racking.
-    When a pallet is quiet flimsy or not construct well and needs extra support.
-    When boxes or product are to be stacked directly onto the racking

Mesh Decks have an advantage of timber products as they resist water damage being a galvanised steel product. They are also easier to keep clean as the dirt and dust falls through them to the ground. The Mesh Decks are also easier to install, move and replace as there is no need for screwing or special clips to hold them in place.

Mesh Decks – Long Span Shelving

Mesh Decks for Long Span Shelving are much the same as Mesh Decks for Pallet Racking, however they are built to take less weight. They are generally a powder coated finish that also resists water damage.

Pallet Rack Mezzanine (Raised Storage Area)

Pallet Rack Mezzanines use the Selective Pallet Racking system to form a raised storage area similar to a Mezzanine floor. Due to the ease of changing the componentry of the Selective Pallet Racking it makes this type of storage easy and quick to install. Pallet Rack Mezzanines also have the ability to have the frames extend through the floor to form additional shelving on top of the Mezzanine. Generally the floor is easy to relocate and the layout can be altered to the requirements of the new warehouse.

Structural Mezzanine

A Structural Mezzanine uses a heavy duty, fabricated steel framework. The Structural Mezzanine is designed and fabricated for a specific layout and purpose and is much harder to relocate and alter if a company moves warehouse. Structural Mezzanines can be altered, however they would normally require additional pieces to be fabricated to make the changes. Structural Mezzanines can usually carry more weight than a Pallet Rack Mezzanine, have a much clearer area underneath with longer spans, and usually cost a fair bit more to install.

Cantilever Racking

Cantilever racking uses a many arms, horizontally in a line, that support long items such as lengths of timber or piping. The arms extend out towards the loading point giving an unobstructed storage area. Cantilever racking can be many arms wide and high to allow for even the longest items. This style of racking is generally custom designed for individual stock and warehouse requirements. Cantilever racking can vary in height, width, weight loads, arm length and single and double sided formats.

Load Signs

Load Signs are signs attached to racking systems to indicate how much load the particular system can handle. The number is usually listed as a SWL (Safe Working Load) or a UDL (Uniformly Distributed Load).

Frame Spacers

Frame Spacers are generally a round or square tube that connects frames that are back to back. The frame spacers bolt on to the frames and hold them apart/together. Frame spacers keep the racking and a set depth apart and also holds the frames together to add stability. The standard length of a frame spacer is 431mm, however other standard sizes are 600mm and 900mm. Frame spacers perform their duty the best when placed at 2.0m intervals.

Also referred to as: Back ties, Frame Connectors, Row Connectors

 
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